All posts tagged: atw

in bloom movie

In Bloom, Georgia: Around the World in Movies

In Bloom was not the movie I intended to see: That would have been Happy Families, the second film by the team of “Nina and Simon,” or Georgian writer/director Nana Ekvtimishvili and her German partner, Simon Gross. Happy Families is playing in Paris, in Georgian, with French subtitles. And so, it seemed, that In Bloom might be the better place to begin. It is, in fact, quite a beginning, to Ekvtimishvili’s career as a chronicler of life in Georgia, a country many of us know best as the one with the same name as the American state. In Bloom is set in 1992, when the country was only newly released from its time under Soviet rule; judging from the state of things in Tbilisi, it does not seem to have been a propitious relationship — even two decades later, when this film was shot. Broken, brutal Tbilisi is the home for the film’s two central character: beautiful Natia and her serious best friend, Eka. (Natia looks like the most beautiful possible Kardashian sister; Eka, like the smartest.) War rages in the north. There is violence at home and …

The Tribe, Ukraine: ATW in Movies

If there’s a single line of spoken dialogue in The Tribe, I don’t remember it: We are in the world of the tribe, a snowier version of whichever island was visited by Piggy, Ralph and the rest in Lord of the Flies. The difference here is that the setting is Ukrainian — the film was shot, if not explicitly set, in Kiev — and the schoolboys are deaf. The film seems in no meaningful way about deafness per se, but it is both interesting and informative to observe how the deaf actors communicate with each other: the back-slaps and jostling and demands for attention. (When you can’t scream, you push.) Watch as well during the melée scene, the busy activity in the background as the crowd of extras communicate their observations with their hands: There’s something uncanny about the physical makeup of the scene until you realize that the pale fluttering in the background is the movement of the actors’ hands. The inability to hear does not, as it turns out, indicate an inability to be cruel, …